Ginisang Sardinas with Misua and Patola Recipe

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The Ginisang Sardinas with Misua and Patola Recipe is a type of food that brings a flood of memories. It’s a rainy day and I suddenly had a craving for this soup. In my growing up years, this is the kind of food that gets served during typhoons as sardines is easy to distribute as relief goods. It’s also a petsa de peligro recipe since it can serve the entire family with less than a hundred pesos. Moms have mastered this recipe and can cook it while sleepy. Because it’s easy to cook, most workers cook this on construction sites. I see them sharing food and makes me think that food is really great at bringing people together.

It also plays a role for college students who are looking for a tummy-filling meal without spending too much. In college, we’d steal – ✌️ehemm, vegetables from the Agriculture Kids at UP Los Banos and cook this sans the Misua. For Holy Week, we also have this because it has no pork and we can do our abstinence. See? I told you, lots of memories. For some reason, just thinking about it makes me drool.

The star of this show is really the patola. Patola (or Ribbed Loofah in English -yes the same one used for your loofah scrub). The fresh ones are rich in Vitamin C which is a great antioxidant plus this is also great for losing weight. They taste great with the Sardines in Tomato Sauce. Poor patola. They get used for jokes a lot -like Patola ka Day! It has absolutely nothing to do with Patola but more to do with “patol” which means stooping down to the level of someone. In today’s parlance – “Dont make patola to the troll.” meaning Don’t feed the troll.

Miswa is a very thin wheat noodles. It seems that this originated in China but our Misua -also known as the Philippine Noodles is thinner than the Chinese Ones. They’re very popular and cheap. It’s available in grocery store’s and even neighborhood Sari Sari Stores.

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